Bittersweet

This book was quite a disappointment. The plot line was meandering and hard to follow, and the main character had almost no autonomy. India Taylor is a 43 year old woman stuck in an unsatisfying marriage. She has four children under the age of 15 and a husband who doesn’t appreciate what she gave up to raise their kids (a prize-winning career as a photojournalist). When India meets Paul Ward, he encourages her to go after what she wants, and continue photography.

What bothered me most about this seemingly innocuous plot line was that India spent the beginning of the novel listening to her husband’s wishes, and the middle part of the novel listening to Paul’s wishes. It took another man telling her that she should be still photographing things for her to stop listening to her husband, who forbade her to continue working. (Spoiler alert!!)

India ends up getting a divorce from Doug, her husband, and Paul and her begin a short-lived romance. After one week, Paul decides he doesn’t love her and leaves her. I guess this is the point in the story where we are supposed to believe that India learns to live for herself and her children, and not a man. Somehow, however, I did not get that. The end is definitely corny and romantic(ish), but certainly not worth the first 400 pages of female subordination.

The back cover of the book, however, is pretty amazing (and actually the reason M bought it for me)

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-A

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